0 In Asia/ Ron Travels/ Taiwan

National Revolutionary Martyrs’ Shrine, Taipei

Almost a year ago, I went to Taiwan with my friends. Then it became too rainy for my Summer posts, so I ‘paused’. Then I unexpectedly travelled to the UK and the rest was forgotten history. But I’m back, and we’re gonna finish Day 3 and Day 4 of my Taiwan trip, together!

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

National Revolutionary Martyrs’ Shrine is one of the most famous historical spots in Taipei. Similar to Sun Yat Sen Memorial Hall, the Martyrs’ Shrine is massive and full of historical stories. It serves as a memorial for the war dead of the Republic of China. About 390,000 tablets are housed in the shrine from various wars that China faced. Although the shrine is in Taiwan, most of those memorialized are from mainland China.

An orange, green and white Paifang (traditional style of a Chinese arch or gateway) welcomes you to the shrine. You will walk about half a kilometer as a massive open space sits between the Paifang and the main shrine. On each side are pavilions, offices, flower pots and flags of Taiwan lined up, as well as, Chinese guardian statues. We also found up close our first of the many pink blossom trees in Taipei. I’m no plant expert and therefore called all of them Sakura. Forgive my ignorance.

Once you step up the entrance building, carvings painted in gold depicts some of the wars and battles that they’ve fought through. The main shrine, with its grand red columns and intricate paintings, is a thing of wonder. However, photographs aren’t allowed inside, I believe as a respect to the dead.

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

Battle of Shanghai

“After Marco Polo bridge incident had broken out on July 1937, Japanese Troops continuedly [sic] pushed southward. For shifting the operations axis from north toward south to east toward west and covering the removal of the seaboard factories and materials to the hinterland to facilitate the prolonged war of resistance, Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek mobilized a strong force to immobilize the main body at the Shanghai Battle Area. In a more than three months bloody fight in shanghai, we inflicted 60,000 odd casualties on the aggressors. The Chinese Armed Forces scored the highest level of gallantry.”

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

Canton Uprising

“On March 29, 1911, Dr. Sun Yat-Sen plotted to launch the 10th uprising in Canton. Huang Hsin led the comrades to assault the viceroy office, but this action failed because of the plan was leaked out to the Manchurian officials. However, this event touched off a nationwide revolutionary tide; and within a year, the Wuchang Uprising overthrew the Manchu Monarchy and the Democratic Republic of China was born.”

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

 

 

Martyr Shrine, Taipei, Taiwan

How To Get There

This one’s a bit tricky because it involves buses.

1. Take the Tamsui-Xinyi Line towards Tamsui.
2. Alight at Jiantan Station.
3. Take the Exit 1 of the station.
4. Find the nearest bus stop where Bus 267, 556 or 902 stops.

At step 4, we had to compare the Chinese characters on Google maps with the ones on the bus stop maps to make sure that what we’re getting on has “Martyrs’ Shrine” on its route.

Did you like it? Share it!

You Might Also Like

No Comments

Leave a Reply