0 In Asia/ Ron Travels/ Taiwan

TAIWAN: Storming Off To Yehliu Geological Park

We decided to tackle the ones outside Taipei on our first day to, for lack of a better phrase, get that out of the way. We weren’t sure if that’s the right decision, but I guess, we’ll find out.

After we fumbled our way through acquiring an Easy Card, we took a train to Taipei Main Station to get to Taipei West Bus Station. From there, we took Bus 1815 to Yehliu. The bus have USB ports, a sure way to impress tourists in this techy world. Bus stops are also announced in English so just wait for ‘Yehliu’ or inform the driver before getting on. As it was our first daylight, we had to fight our heavy eyelids to look through raindrops and appreciate Taiwan.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Charging in a public transportation? Check!

Around an hour and 20 minutes later, we arrived at the Yehliu bus stop. We didn’t read anything about walking so we were quite lost. It was just roads and establishments. Then, a taxi driver approached us and offered us a ride to the park for 100 NTD. We declined (wrong decision), we were trying to be adventurous, okay?!

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

This was taken from the shop across the bus stop. The lane at the rightmost of this photo is where you’ll start to walk until you arrive at the park.

Across the bus stop is a shop, I decided to buy a raincoat (right) but not an umbrella (wrong). After asking directions from strangers, we braved our way to the park. Drenched and cold, we arrived at the park, a kilometer or so from the bus stop.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

After you pay an entrance fee of 50 NTD, you will be able to start your walk around the park. The flow of visitors will ultimately lead you to the rock formations.

The Queen and The Princess

Welcoming you to the park are replicas of two of their most famous rock formations, the Queen and the Cute Princess’ head. They are recreated using fibre glass as they believe that the original rock formations may stop to exist due to erosion.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

After the garden with the replicas, a clear pathway is available for easy access as tourist observe the formations. Saying hello from the other side, ocean waves splashes against these beautiful rocks. A bit slippery when raining, so take extra caution.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Signs can guide you around the park with labels as to which formations are available in each area. Rock formations resembling mushrooms, candles and camels can be seen aplenty.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

The Queen’s Head is surrounded by little rocks and tourists are not allowed to go past these lined up rocks. The others are available for close inspection, as long as you’re mindful of the red lines and guides.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

The park stretches around 1.7 km into the ocean. It is believed that these rock formations were formed as Earthly forces pushed some of Datun Mountain from the ocean. It is always curious and awe-inspiring when Mother Nature wants to show off.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

A statue dedicated to Lian Tian Zhen, a local fisherman who, on March 18, 1964, jumped into the sea to save student Chang Guoquan who fell into the sea by accident.

Unfortunately, they both drowned. A nice, yet sad tribute to Zhen’s heroic act is this statue overlooking the cape.

Taiwan: Yehliu Geological Park

It’s a shame that we visited on a gloomy day. Rain is usually inconvenient unless you’re wrapped with warm blanket in your bedroom. I definitely recommend going to Yehliu on a sunny day. Well, I recommend traveling anywhere on a sunny day, really. Despite the bad weather though, we could still appreciate the beauty of these rocks and how the place is well maintained. Would I want to go back? Definitely.

How To Get There

Taipei MRT

  1. From your nearest MRT, make your way to Taipei Main Station.
  2. Read the overhead signs and exit to Terminal A of the West Bus Station.
  3. Get on Bus 1815. Fare from Taipei to Yehliu is 96 NTD.
  4. Alight at the Yehliu bus stop and either walk to the geological park or take a taxi which will cost around 100 NTD. I recommend the taxi when it’s raining.
  5. Entrance Fee to the park is 50 NTD. A special rate is available for groups of 20 and more.

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